Is it possible to be Pagan without following a European tradition?

I know about Kemetism but what about Pagans who incorporate non-European deities etc. Let’s say I incorporated Quetzalcoatl into my Pagan practices (or is that New Age?)

13 thoughts on “Is it possible to be Pagan without following a European tradition?

  1. Native American religion is often Pagan in nature, so incorporating that into your Pagan beliefs works just as well as European Pagan religions.

  2. Uh, Paganism originated in Europe, silly! I would recommend more study in Heathenism (Asatruars)!

  3. Of course. Every pre-christian polytheistic belief is by definition pagan.

    It is, however, not advisable to mix different beliefs and practices. For example, if you honour European god/desses and use european-based tradition for your rituals, it’s NOT a good idea to invite Quetzalcoatl. Chaos may ensue.
    Chose one path, one tradition, and STICK to it.

  4. Depending on your definition of ‘pagan’ or what it means to be a pagan.

    Usually, the definition of pagan is a non-Abrahamic religion. So technically, Hindus and Shintoists (as already mentioned above) are ‘pagan’. We tend to use the word pagan to refer to European paths because the Christian church during the Middle Ages was based in Europe and referred to the polytheistic religions as ‘paganism’.

    However, not all pagan traditions are European. You have already mentioned Kemetism, and there are many other Middle Eastern pagan traditions (predating monotheistic religions) if you are interested in looking.

    My own path, as a Qadish, is the path of the Canaanites. The Canaanites were not European. They were Middle Eastern and had a Middle Eastern culture and religion (but, as already stated, predating the monotheistic religions). However, they could still be seen as pagan, and their religion, customs and practises could be seen as pagan. So this is an example of another non-European pagan path. There is also the following which are pagan and not European:

    – Canaanite
    – Egyptian
    – Babylonian
    – Sumerian
    – Hurrian
    – Hittite

    These are examples of Middle Eastern pagan tradition, and they are still practised today. A lot of Shamanic beliefs are also pagan in nature (although some European cultures, for example the Norse, still had shamans). Most paganism is European as practised today, but there are plenty of other regions.

    You mentioned the Aztecs specifically. There is an Aztec polytheistic tradition today, and it is not New Age (as it is reconstructing a very old tradition). I will provide a link to a website I found on it.

    However, as already mentioned by some other users, I would not recommend worshipping Egyptian gods alongside Aztec ones. Even if you did, I would recommend worshipping the Aztec ones through specifically Aztec rituals and practises, and Egyptian ones through specifically Egyptian rituals and practises. The website does mention that Aztec gods pride themselves on being seen as individuals and usually do not like to be seen as the same or associated with other gods, and if you wanted to serve them, you have to respect their rules.

    Now, you

  5. That depends on how you define paganism.

    If you ask me, I would say it’s perfectly possible, since I tend to define paganism as ANY non-Abrahamic faith that self-identifies as pagan. I know several pagans who incorporate Aztec or Mayan deities in their practice. I think it is only so rare because little is known about Them.
    -Scarlet

  6. Maybe.

    Getting away from the whole Pantheon mixing can be stupid argument, how you incorporate the non-European deities would matter here. There’s very little reason to call it Pagan (a European word) if it has nothing to do with any pre- or post- Christian European religions.

    Plus, those movements have THEIR OWN WORDS for their movements… it’s always better to call a religion by the words the religion uses for those words.

  7. Greetings!

    “Pagan” is a Latin word for “country dweller”, and I guarantee, that any Hindu, Buddhist, or other large “non-Abrahamic” Religion DOES NOT refer to their Faith as “Pagan”.

    I do not care for “slang”, and using a word or name incorrectly, DOES NOT change the true meaning of ANY word.

    In Ancient Rome, before Christianity, the large Temples made a lot of money selling their Religion. They called people who belonged to small Religions “Pagan” as an insult. When the Christians rose to power, they killed the previous inhabitants, kept the Temples, sold Relics, Spells, and Blessings ( just like the previous inhabitants ) made a ton of money, and used the word “Pagan” to refer to the previous inhabitants….and still do.

    Now, it is certainly ok and correct to call YOURSELF and your Path “Pagan”, if you belong to a small, Earth-Based Religion, such as Wicca, but the Religion of Khem, the Aztec, the Maya, all were ( and some still are ) Religions with large Temples in huge Cities. They are not “Pagan”-never were.

    Get over using “Christian” terms, for anything. They are on their way out. Just a bad memory. In fact, they can ALL go to Heaven RIGHT NOW! Go now, please!

    So, the Answer to your Question, is yes.

    “Pagans” are the original Eclectics. They follow whatever they want, do whatever they want, always have, always will.

    /!\

  8. Of course. Followers of Hinduism and Shinto are pagans, for example. Anything non-Judeo-Christian is pagan.

  9. Shinto, Hinduism, And Traditional Mesoamerican Religion are all pagan, while also being Non-European.

  10. That would be a little New Agey, IMHO, unless you actually went the route of studying how Quetzalcoatl was honored in the context of the time and place. It’s not a very good idea to do plug and play with religion without at least having a frame of reference for how that deity was originally worshiped.

    I did used to know a Atzec reconstructionalist here on YA R&S, but she hasn’t posted in a long time. She did NOT like being called Pagan.

    Here’s a link for you: http://www.amoxtli.org/cuezali/index.html

  11. of course it’s possible…

    i’m a Hurrian Polytheist, and i usually don’t say I’m Pagan…but by modern definition i suppose all Polytheistic paths would be different branches of Paganism? not just the European?

    and what about Greek and Roman cultures mixing with foreign ones in the past to create various hybrid religious traditions…with Egyptian and Syrian deities for example….so aren’t those traditions “Pagan?” definately yes

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