Are there examples in literature of angels depicted as being visible to children and the elderly?

In the film Wings of Desires (dir. Wim Wenders, 1987) angels are visible by young children and, if I remember correctly, they can be sensed by the elderly. To everyone else they are invisible. The only exception is that former angels can sense their presence (e.g. Peter Falk’s character often says “I can’t see you, but I know you’re there.”). Is this depiction of angels unique to the film or does it occur elsewhere in film or literature?

3 thoughts on “Are there examples in literature of angels depicted as being visible to children and the elderly?

  1. well skellig is about an angel found by a boy in his garage. don’t know if adults can see him or not but read it and see, it’s only short!

  2. I am Hispanic-American and my parents share fables, folktales, etc that are not defined as ghost stories, but involve spirits. It’s often the animals, the elderly, and the young who can sense and see spirits. I have seen many films and read many works that follow the same basic rule in multiple languages and cultures, so I would guess it’s basic. Sometimes teenagers and young adults can see spirits, but only if they are close to death, have someone they love close to death, or have been disrespectful to their parents (even though that’s more in dreams and nightmares). So no, it’s not unique, but I guess the way Wenders has the story set can be unique.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *