Where can I find more information on Pagan beliefs that isn’t Wikipedia?

I’m trying to find more information of pagan religions, preferably the ancient ones although New Age is OK too. Anyone have any good websites or books to recommend on the subject? Thanks!

14 thoughts on “Where can I find more information on Pagan beliefs that isn’t Wikipedia?

  1. Check out books that have to deal with the history of Rome. Rome used to be a pagan city until Constantine introduced Christianity.

  2. For ancient beliefs, read a history book.

    For new age beliefs, read Harry Potter.

  3. gotquestions.org A question concerning pagan beliefs might have already been answered. But if not, just ask your question, and someone will help you.

    ^^^ really good site.

  4. this website is ok for looking up general beliefs. As for ancient ones, you have to go history books and archeology as there really isn’t much left, written, of the ancient beliefs. You could do a search on Reconstruction Paganism… you’ll find info on the Celts and the Norse religions. Kemetic is Egyptian Paganism… and Hellenism is Greek/Roman. Celtic Recon and of course Asatru (Norse/Germanic)

  5. In the history and anthropolical sections of libraries and book stores.

    Don’t focus on just the religios aspects and the spirituality of it. Look into the entire culture and you’ll learn the most that way.

  6. The answer really depends on which specific pagan culture you want to know about.

    Germanic:
    http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/
    http://www.amazon.com/Our-Troth-History-Lore-1/dp/1419635980

    Celtic:
    http://www.paganachd.com/faq/

    BeliefNet used to have some good basic info on a variety of earth-based and reconstructionist faiths, before it was sold off a year or so back:
    http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/index.aspx

    But Heathen Princess made a really good point. You want a complete immersion in all available literature and lore on a given culture to really get a decent understanding of it. Not just the religion but the full range of its known history. Academic sources are usually preferable to pagan authors, except when the focus in solely on magic. In those cases, the pagan writers have a big advantage over the professors who must tread cautiously to avoid peer ridicule.

  7. I think what you are looking for then are Reconstructionist religions – groups that are trying to piece back together the worship of the gods based on historical, archeological and written works of pre-christian Europe.

    There are quite a few links to that, so I would sugest picking a location or culture to start with.

    For general Pagan articles, browse here: http://www.ecauldron.net/articles/index.php

    Norse/Germanic: http://www.thetroth.org/
    Baltic: http://vinland.org/heathen/pagancee/
    Celtic: http://www.dmoz.org/Society/Religion_and_Spirituality/Pagan/Celtic/
    Finnish: http://www.lehto-ry.org/english.html
    Canaanite: http://canaanitepath.com/stele.htm
    Egyptian: http://www.kemet.org/home.html
    Greek: http://ysee.gr/index-eng.php
    Roman: http://www.novaroma.org/
    Slavic: http://www.freewebs.com/bookofveles/slavicneopaganism.htm (only English one I could find)

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