Why is Halloween considered a “pagan” holiday?

Question by I need answers: Why is Halloween considered a “pagan” holiday?
But are not most holidays began as a “pagan” festival including Easter, Christmas,etc?

Best answer:

Answer by Nick S.
Yes those are considered pagan also.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

12 thoughts on “Why is Halloween considered a “pagan” holiday?

  1. They’re all pagan festivals, but since Halloween is the “spooky one” and they don’t want their innocent little kids doing it, they single it out.

  2. It’s no more or less “pagan” than Yule/Xmas, Easter and Midsummer.

    These are the modern incarnations of the 4 cardinal festivals of the solar calendar which have been celebrated in various ways since antiquity, probably since the neolithic period when the solar calendar was first devised.

  3. Yes, it’s a Pagan festival, but I don’t see what the problem is, I mean, Christians celebrate the public holiday on Columbus Day, and it’s not like he’s a Saint or anything.

  4. Initially because theists couldn’t impose their religion on it.

    These days, because it’s more fun than the others.

    Hmmm… cause and effect?

  5. Halloween is a Christian holiday.

    The day after Halloween is All Saints’, & then All Souls’

  6. The only holidays, technically, that aren’t considered “pagan” are Jewish holidays. All of the rest, are pagan. Oddly enough, many of the traditions we use today comes from Germany and has absolutely nothing to do with any traditions from the Middle East.

  7. Halloween. The Encyclopedia Americana says: “Elements of the customs connected with Halloween can be traced to a Druid [ancient Celtic priesthood] ceremony in pre-Christian times. The Celts had festivals for two major gods—a sun god and a god of the dead . . . , whose festival was held on November 1, the beginning of the Celtic New Year. The festival of the dead was gradually incorporated into Christian ritual.”

    http://www.watchtower.org/e/bh/appendix_14.htm

  8. NonChristians say this. The early Christians tried to convert pagans, and they tried to cover up their feast days with Christian holy days.

  9. Yes, but to be slightly more accurate, the Christian holidays you mention are celebrated at the same time as certain pagan or non-Christian celebrations. This happens because, when you’re starting a religion, you need to incorporate holidays and traditions from the existing belief systems so that it’s easier for people to make the transition, and so they’re more willing to change. Like, if you were starting a religion now, you’d have to have Christmas (in some form; call it something else, I guess) or nobody’s going to buy it.
    Halloween is “All Hallow’s Eve,” the day before All Saints Day, November 1st. So, Halloween–at least, with that name and that particular date–has its roots in Christianity; specifically, Catholicism.
    Edit: I’ve worked in elementary schools in predominently Christian (Baptist, most likely) areas. I had kids saying they didn’t celebrate Halloween because it wasn’t Christian. This is what happens when people don’t really understand their own religion.

  10. look them up, its simple, dictionary.com or just google them, they were started mostly by non christians and alot were festivals to other gods or saints..

  11. The Encyclopedia Americana says: “Elements of the customs connected with Halloween can be traced to a ancient Celtic priesthood ceremony in pre-Christian times. The Celts had festivals for two major gods. A sun god and a god of the dead, whose festival was held on November 1, the beginning of the Celtic New Year. The festival of the dead was gradually incorporated into Christian ritual.”

  12. So that religious fanatic jerks have something else to be upset about.

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