Nice Emily Dickinson photos

Some cool Emily Dickinson images:

DSC_8486

Image by asterix611
Emily Dickinson’s Garden: Poetry of Flowers – Many of Emily’s poems and letters allude to her love of plants, flowers and the natural world. This comprehensive exhibition reveals the renowned poet as a less well-known gardener. A re-creation of Dickinson’s 19th century New England flower garden and her home, the Homestead, in the Enid A Haupt Conservatory showcases her favorite plants and flowers in the surrounding that inspired so much of her writing. A rare glimpse of Emily’s world, her reclusiveness, her adoration of flowers and plants, her reluctance to share her poetry with outsiders is seen through books, manuscripts, photographs, and the white dress, in the William Rodina and Giovanni Foroni LoFaro Gallery of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library. – New York Botanical Garden – 05/18/10

DSC_8454

Image by asterix611
Emily Dickinson’s Garden: Poetry of Flowers – Many of Emily’s poems and letters allude to her love of plants, flowers and the natural world. This comprehensive exhibition reveals the renowned poet as a less well-known gardener. A re-creation of Dickinson’s 19th century New England flower garden and her home, the Homestead, in the Enid A Haupt Conservatory showcases her favorite plants and flowers in the surrounding that inspired so much of her writing. A rare glimpse of Emily’s world, her reclusiveness, her adoration of flowers and plants, her reluctance to share her poetry with outsiders is seen through books, manuscripts, photographs, and the white dress, in the William Rodina and Giovanni Foroni LoFaro Gallery of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library. – New York Botanical Garden – 05/18/10

DSC_8369

Image by asterix611
Emily Dickinson’s Garden: Poetry of Flowers – Many of Emily’s poems and letters allude to her love of plants, flowers and the natural world. This comprehensive exhibition reveals the renowned poet as a less well-known gardener. A re-creation of Dickinson’s 19th century New England flower garden and her home, the Homestead, in the Enid A Haupt Conservatory showcases her favorite plants and flowers in the surrounding that inspired so much of her writing. A rare glimpse of Emily’s world, her reclusiveness, her adoration of flowers and plants, her reluctance to share her poetry with outsiders is seen through books, manuscripts, photographs, and the white dress, in the William Rodina and Giovanni Foroni LoFaro Gallery of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library. – New York Botanical Garden – 05/18/10

analysis for emily dickinson “the lightning is a yellow fork”?

Question by Madison Haas: analysis for emily dickinson “the lightning is a yellow fork”?

The Lightning is a yellow Fork
From Tables in the sky
By inadvertent fingers dropt
The awful Cutlery

Of mansions never quite disclosed
And never quite concealed
The Apparatus of the Dark
To ignorance revealed.

Best answer:

Answer by read exclamation
I think it’s talking about communication between spirits that are in another world, and that communication we accidentally see, because they cannot be completely hidden, as lightening strikes that fall off their “table” of issues and problems, as they communicate about them. Their apparatus, or mode of communication, can’t be seen by us because we are too ignorant, but it will eventually be revealed to all the ignorant life forms in the universe and Earth.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

emily dickinson, “I am nobody”?

Question by Erika: emily dickinson, “I am nobody”?
hey, im writing a paper and i have 1 question.

why does Dickinson think that being a “nobody” is a good thing and why does she think being a “somebody” and being in the “public” are detrimental to human individuality?

Best answer:

Answer by Underground Man
That’s so weird. I was just thinking of this poem yesterday…

She thinks that people are mostly idiots, so she’d rather be anonymous than well known so she wouldn’t have to deal with them.

Give your answer to this question below!