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All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘John’

  • Q&A: Is F. Scott Fitzgerald the 20th century John Keats?

    Question by ebonys_finest: Is F. Scott Fitzgerald the 20th century John Keats?
    I found a statement that says “Fitzgerald has been referred to as a 20th-century John Keats.” I was just wondering what you guys thought about this. I think they are both similar in the way of their imaginations and such but I don’t know that much about Keats. What do you think of this comparison?

    Best answer:

    Answer by MOM KNOWS EVERYTHING
    Fitzgerald wrote novels and short stories. Keats wrote poetry. I think the comparison is awkward, to say the least.

    Give your answer to this question below!

  • Q&A: Who knows of a font, based on John Keats’ handwriting?

    Question by Space Ranger: Who knows of a font, based on John Keats’ handwriting?
    I have decided to get a tattoo from John Keats “A thing of beauty is a joy forever”.
    I know where the tattoo is going to be and the colour, but I can’t find a font that is based on his handwriting. Does a font exist out there in the internet or a solid replacement?

    Best answer:

    Answer by Kathryn W
    Can’t say that I’ve ever heard of one, but feel free to prove me wrong.

    EDIT: This site has a comprehensive list of fonts.

    http://www.fonts.com

    Add your own answer in the comments!

  • TO AUTUMN’ by John Keats 1819

    rnaudioproductions for www.ipodity.com www.allcast.co.uk Autumn by John Keats read by Frances Jeater Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells. Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store? Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind; Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep, Drows’d with the fume of poppies, while thy hook Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers: And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep Steady thy laden head across a brook; Or by a cyder-press, with patient look, Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours. Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they? Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,– While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day, And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue; Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn Among the river sallows, borne aloft Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies; And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn; Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft The red

  • John Singer Sargent – Murals

    The Sargent Murals at the Boston Public Library Description and interpretation John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) is best known today as a painter of brilliant society portraits. In 1890, at the age of thirty-four, the artist embraced the opportunity to demonstrate his skill in mural decoration, a genre that his own era considered superior to portraiture. Triumph of Religion, created between 1890 and 1919, was Sargent’s first and most complex mural cycle, and the work he hoped to make his masterpiece.Sargent painted all of the panels for Triumph of Religion on canvas in England. He then accompanied them to Boston to orchestrate their installation in four separate phases over a twenty-four-year period between 1895 and 1919. Triumph of Religion was far more ambitious—and far more complicated in both style and idea—than anything the artist attempted in his subsequent mural commissions.Unlike most murals, Triumph of Religion was a multimedia extravaganza, its painted surfaces enhanced by relief materials such as plaster, papier-mâché, metalwork, stencils or patterned cut-outs of various sorts, “jewels” made of glass, and Lincrusta-Walton, a corrugated commercial wall covering used by interior decorators. Sargent gilded or painted the Lincrusta, carefully adjusting it in the process of installation in order to catch and direct light in the manner he desired.Sargent chose the content of the murals with their intended location—the Library’s Special Collections Hall (later known as

  • how to you interpret john keats “o thou whose face hat felt the winter’s wind”?

    Question by Pink_star: how to you interpret john keats “o thou whose face hat felt the winter’s wind”?
    the last 2 lines. “he who saddens at thought of idleness cnnot be idle, and he’s awake who thinks himself asleep” what does that mean?
    O thou whose face hath felt the Winter’s wind,
    Whose eye has seen the snow-clouds hung in mist,
    And the black elm-tops ‘mong the freezing stars,
    To thee the Spring will be a harvest-time.
    O thou, whose only book has been the light
    Of supreme darkness which thou feddest on
    Night after night when Phoebus was away,
    To thee the Spring shall be a triple morn.
    O fret not after knowledge – I have none,
    And yet my song comes native with the warmth.
    O fret not after knowledge – I have none,
    And yet the Evening listens. He who saddens
    At thought of idleness cannot be idle,
    And he’s awake who thinks himself asleep.

    what does the last two lines mean?

    Best answer:

    Answer by libby l
    You must include the words of the poem if you are serious about getting an answer.

    What do you think? Answer below!

  • The Wyndham Sisters: Lady Elcho, Mrs. Adeane, Mrs. Tennent by John Singer Sargent

    The Wyndham Sisters: Lady Elcho, Mrs. Adeane, Mrs. Tennent by John Singer Sargent

    Image by peterjr1961
    The Wyndham Sisters: Lady Elcho, Mrs. Adeane, Mrs. Tennent by John Singer Sargent By the time that Sargent painted this large wok, he was sufficiently well-known to require that his sitters pose for him in his studio. He nade an exception for the Wyndham siters – from left, Madeline Adreane, Pamela Tennent, and Mary Constance, Lady Echo – posing them in the drawing room of their family residence in London. George F. Watts’s portrait of their mother is visible on the wall behind them.

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